Your Community Newspaper

Lumby, Lavington, Whitevale, Coldstream, Vernon & Cherryville

Your Community Newspaper

Lumby, Lavington, Whitevale, Coldstream, Vernon & Cherryville

Your Community Newspaper

Lumby, Lavington, Whitevale, Coldstream, Vernon & Cherryville

Zucchini

What Do You Call A Hairy Zucchini With Attitude?… Sass Squash!

I was so pleased with the rain we received this last week.  It even started a day earlier than was forecast although I nearly ruined that by threatening to go out and dance naked in it as it suddenly stopped.  Fortunately it resumed and I made no further threats.  It was nice that it did’t come down in a single deluge but allowed each episode to soak in to the ground.  Once soil becomes as dry as it has been of late it is difficult for it to penetrate and can just run off doing damage and accomplishing little.  I am amazed at how it allowed areas to green up and this next forecast of rain should even accomplish more.  I have noticed the seasonal lower temperatures at night and the shorter days are very evident.  I have an Ash tree in my yard and it is the first tree to start to turn yellow and there is a small area that is doing this now and it is not heat stress.  I hope that our fall season stretches out as I feel that we were definitely shorted last year with the early snow fall.  The cooler daytime temperatures that we should now experience will be a great relief for many especially those fighting the fires.  It’s sad to hear that there is a fire near Sugar Lake and hopefully it will be short lived and do not serious damage.  We all still need to remain vigilant.

Many people as well as myself grow Zucchini and with the abundance that is growing so rapidly in my garden I was looking for some recipes and found some information on how consuming it is so healthy for us.  Zucchini or Baby Marrow is a summer squash that is normally easy to grow.  It comes in green and gold and can grow to 3 feet in length, although I am going for gold by allowing one to continue until the season is over to see how large I can get it.  It was originally cultivated in Milan in the 19th century and introduced to North America in the 1920s.  It is now grown throughout the world with it being especially popular in Britain.  It can be eaten raw or cooked prepared by baking, frying, steaming, boiling or grilling it.  It can also be grated and used in many baking and soup recipes.  The flowers too, both the male and female are edible and are picked when firm and only partially open.  You should remove the pistols and stamens before consuming.  Zucchini is low in calories and high in Potassium which is good for blood pressure and therefore good for your heart.  It has lots of liquid which is good for hydration.  It is low in cholesterol and has antioxidants that are good for your eyes and skin, this also is good for protection from certain cancers such as prostrate cancer.  It strengthens bones and is an excellent vegetable to consume for people with irritable bowel symptoms, colitis and crones disease.  It is helpful in lowering blood sugar and spikes in blood sugar and increases ones sensitivity to insulin.

Although Zucchini is relatively easy to grow it should be watched closely for a few problems that can kill the plant or decrease productivity.  It is a favourite with Aphids which can do damage such as causing the wrinkling of the leaves.  Aphids can also spread fungal diseases that can destroy the plant which will cause yellow spots to develop on both leaves and fruit.  Other fungal diseases will cause the plant to wilt like it isn’t being watered or the leaves may look like they are covered in powder.  Insect infestations can usually be handled by spraying with soapy water but the fungal diseases may require that you remove the entire plant and save it for burning when we can.  Other small fungal issues can be remedied by the use of a sulphur spray or by using Neam Oil.   You should rotate your garden crops as these fungal diseases can overwinter in the soil.  Zucchini is also susceptible to Blossom End Rot which is a Calcium deficiency that can be rectified by water soluble treatments and the use of a small amount of Epsom salts once a month which will help with the uptake of Calcium.

Happy Gardening!
Samantha Nason
BS Ranch & Greenhouses
250 547 6567
sam1nason@gmail.com

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