Welcome to the New World

When we were kids, washing our hands constantly was not what we did. We played outside for hours, touching everything.  If it was raining, we would stay inside, and played. When it was dinner time we came in and washed up before dinner, or after using the bathroom (that was a must). 

My mom cleaned the house all the time, once a week you would walk in and smell the very strong smell of bleach obviously it was laundry day. While doing the laundry she would use a cloth to wipe down certain things with bleach mixed with water. Was she doing this to sanitize things? Nope, she was just doing this to clean the kitchen. (Bleach called Chlorine in 1774 was created by a Swedish chemist by the name of Karl Wilhelm Scheele, in 1785 a French Chemist by the name of Claude Berthollet showed the world the Bleaching Properties of this chemical called Chlorine.)

We rarely got sick, sure we had some colds, flus, chicken pox and other childhood things, we got well again and went back to what we were doing before, playing in the rain, dirt, mud, riding our bikes, playing tag, etc. 

We would go our neighbor’s houses and they would come to ours. Sometimes it was for just a visit, a dinner, a party or whatever. Everyone would hug, or shake hands. The parents would be in one room and we would be in another. Sometimes, there were card games and other board games to be played, sometimes there was dancing, and sometimes it was just a movie night, but whatever we did there was never social distancing.

There were times when we went to the stores, sometimes for food, if we went to the grocery store our list would be, meat, eggs, bread, butter, milk, etc. Sometimes we went for clothes or whatever.  Still we touched everything. Nowhere were we ever told to wash our hands constantly, or to sanitize our hands, as we never even heard of hand sanitizer at that time. (Hand Sanitizer was created in 1966 by a student nurse that had lived in Bakersfield California his name was Lupe Hernandez)

 When coming home from shopping we would just put the groceries away, not once did we ever think to wipe them down with a Lysol wipe (Lysol is a big-name brand that has been in households for what seems like forever. Lysol was first introduced in 1889 by Gustav Raupenstrauch. Lysol wipes did not appear on the scene until 2000.) 

People of all ages, race, and cultures, would be shopping beside you and talking to you. No one wore a mask or gloves (unless it was winter then everyone was bundled up.) 

How things have changed since we were kids!

Now before we leave the house, we are washing and sanitizing our hands. We carry sanitizer, masks, and gloves in our car (I also have some in my purse.) We enter or exit stores and we sanitize our hands. We use Lysol wipes to wipe down the carts just in case they have not already been done. Our shopping lists now contain the words Bleach* Lysol Wipes* Hand Sanitizer* Household Sanitizer* then farther down on the list is the food we need. When we return to our car, we use our little sanitizer bottle to sanitize our hands again just in case we touched something else on the way to the car. When we return home, we use our Lysol wipes to wipe down the groceries before putting them away. 

We no longer do our favorite things like visiting our friends without social distancing. We don’t shake their hands, or give them a hug, even though sometimes they or us may need one. We don’t go out dancing with other people (I really miss that) or go to the movies. We no longer go where large crowds will be even if it is a Wedding, a Funeral, or a Celebration of Life.

It is a very different world we live in now, and although some things have changed, we can still go out into our backyards, on our porches, or where ever and we can still enjoy the sunshine, or watch the birds fly high in the sky. We can still see the moon and the beauty of nature in all its glory. 

One thing to remember in all of these changes that we now live by is we are definitely becoming more respectful of others around us, and a very clean, society. 

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