Raspberries

What Do You Call A Raspberry That Uses Foul Language?… Berry Rude!

It was an unfortunate turn of events to have cancelled the Lumby & District Public Market this last Saturday.  Between the smoke and the heat to many of us were unable to attend and we were concerned too that it was not the best of times for our clients to attend.  We will be back in full force this coming Saturday and I will still be holding an International Geranium Day!  I have had so many people tell me of their unfortunate and total loss of their Raspberry crops.  It seems with the intense heat that many have found their canes frazzled to almost death.  I suggest that you keep watering them deeply as next years canes will still emerge from the ground if some maintenance is provided.  I would not cut back the canes that should have bore fruit this summer until this fall.  Hopefully this is a one shot loss and that the plant itself will survive.  They are extremely hardy.  Mine have survived quite well although I find that some of the berries are smaller and they are ripening with alarming speed.  A few more picks over the next week or so will find that this years crop will have come to an end.  The berries are still sweet and the plants seem very hardy.  I count myself fortunate!  Raspberries like full sun that being a minimum of 6 to 8 hours a day, the soil should be rich with compost and well draining,  they enjoy a good deep watering over the summer months.  They should not be planted where tomatoes, peppers, eggplant or other members of the nightshade plants were formally planted.  These plants can arbor verticillium wilt which can affect the plants.  I mulch mine heavily in fall with compost and then leaves and have yet to fertilize the plants with anything.  Do not spray with anything!  Raspberries are a delicate fruit and only should be rinsed quickly before consumption if at all.  They last only 4 to 5 days after harvest and should be eaten or frozen for future use within this time frame.  Raspberries are high in Antioxidants and Vitamins and are also a good source of fibre.  I have recently been informed of the value of coffee grounds for the Raspberry plants as well as Epsom salts which I firmly believe in for all plants, indoor and out.

A young woman stopped by my greenhouse the other day and as I was showing her around I pointed out some Elderberry bushes that I have been eating from as the berries became ripe.  She so kindly informed me  that raw Elderberries can cause some symptoms of which I have been complaining of over the last little while including dizziness and nausea, this I attributed to too much sun and heat although I have avoided that carefully.  Elderberry is wonderful once cook as in Jams, Pies and Teas but should not be consumed raw and has been known to be fatal when eaten leaves roots and all by cattle, sheep and pigs.  Well there you go I won’t be doing that again!

Samantha Nason
BS Ranch & Greenhouses
250 547 6567 • samanthanason@hotmail.com

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