New Years Resolution

Exercise – Part 2

Last week we talked about the benefits of doing endurance training, or what people refer to as Cardio.  Cardiovascular exercise is very important for our circulatory system and although it improves our cardiovascular fitness, it does not prevent the loss of muscle tissue. Only strength training maintains our muscle mass and strength throughout our mid-life years. After the age of 20 up to 1/2 pound of muscle tissue is lost per year in both males and females owing to the normal ageing process. 

This week is about the importance of resistance/strength training and its benefits, along with the long-lasting calorie burn we get from it.  Because muscle is very active tissue, muscle loss is accompanied by a reduction in our resting metabolism (calorie burn). Research indicates that an average adult experiences a 5% reduction in metabolic rate every decade of life. Only resistance/strength training can help to avoid this. 

Increase Metabolic Rate = Burn Calories at Rest!

Research reveals that adding 10 lbs of muscle increases our resting metabolism by 7% and our daily calorie requirements by 15%. At rest, 2 lbs of muscle requires 77 calories per day for tissue maintenance, and during exercise muscle energy utilization increases dramatically. Adults who replace muscle through sensible strength exercise, use more calories all day long, thereby reducing the likelihood of fat accumulation. 

Reduce Body Fat and Eat More!

Studies have shown that with a proper strength exercise program, sustained for over a period of 2 months, produced 10 lbs of fat loss, with subjects eating 155 more calories per day than usual. That is, a basic strength-training program resulted in 8 lbs more muscle, 10 lbs less fat and more calories per day, of food intake.

Fear Not Ladies!

Even though resistance/strength training raises testosterone levels in men and women, women simply do not produce enough to have the same effect as men.  Ladies, it WILL NOT make you have big bulky muscles like a man, but quite the opposite, instead, a sleek toned body.  

Besides all the above from fat loss, too burning more calories, resistance/strength training also ensures a better quality of life.  Loss of strength and muscle mass, are the prime causes of many age-related diseases.  See below on how else this type of training can benefit us. 

Improve your Immunity!

Immune strength depends on the availability of the amino acid glutamine and your muscles have to supply the glutamine to your immune system in order for it to work. The more muscle you have the more abundant the glutamine supply, and other things being equal, the better your immune system works. 

Combat Diabetes!

Several published studies have shown that weight training has an unexpected benefit – it improves glucose tolerance in patients with Type 2 diabetes

Whack Arthritis!

At Tufts University in the USA, researches gave patients with rheumatoid arthritis 10 weeks of high-intensity weight training. Results showed significant reductions in joint pain and fatigue and a big gain in strength. The resistance training caused a significant decline in arthritis activity. 

Increase Bone Mineral Density!

The effects of progressive resistance exercise are similar for muscle tissue and bone tissue. The same training stimulus that increases muscle strength, also increases bone density and mineral content.  A study at Stanford University showed clearly that about 20% of bone mineral density is dependent on maintaining muscle. 

*Be sure to join our virtual DEEM Health classes to ensure you get your resistant training in.  Great for all levels and done easily from the comfort of your own home.

*If this article or any past articles leaves you with questions, the want to be a better you, the courage to take the first step to a happier you, than please contact me at: 

Mikkie Nettles, Certified Personal Trainer/Holistic & Sports Nutritionist
Follow DEEM Health on Facebook, or contact info@deemhealth.ca

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